Leon de Haas

Leon de Haas

I practice philosophy as a counselor and trainer in the Netherlands and Germany. I am a board member of the German professional organization of philosophical practitioners (BV-PP, daughter organization of the IGPP). I am currently doing research on the consequences of Wittgenstein's later philosophy for philosophical practice.

Gert Achenbach’s dictum, “Philosophical Practice does not have a method”, has its friends and its enemies. I am a friend. It is my thesis, that, since Husserl’s and Wittgenstein’s phenomenological and linguistic interventions in Modern philosophy, professional philosophers cannot use any jargon, expert knowledge, or method whatsoever.

LeonDeHaasVIDEO: Interview with Leon de Haas:
The First Session of Philosophical Counseling

[spvideo]http://youtu.be/-p4VqT-dGz8[/spvideo]

 

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We can consider 'Method' as an answer to the question, “What is happening in a philosophical conversation? How do you do it?”

Many of those who write about methods in philosophical practice refer to the ancient Greek 'methodos'. As the contraction of meta and ´odos indicates, it would just mean that we follow a specific road. We cannot deny that, metaphorically speaking, we follow a road in philosophy practice. So, that's not the issue.

By ‘method’ I understand a fixed way to realize a pre-conceived effect. By example, to manufacture a car, you can do it with robots, or manually. Or to reach the top of a mountain, sometimes you can go by ski lift, or climb up the mountain.

Gert Achenbach’s dictum, “Philosophical Practice does not have a method”, has its friends and its enemies. I am a friend.

It is my thesis, that, since Husserl’s and Wittgenstein’s phenomenological and linguistic interventions in Modern philosophy, professional philosophers cannot use any jargon, expert knowledge, or method whatsoever.


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